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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 773 (some duplicates have been removed)
gay. authorities in iraq are behind the systematic persecution of homosexuals, and capturing the world in color a century after usmovies broke out in black and white, the first films are being discovered. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. no american ambassador has been killed in the line of duty since 1979, but today the flags haveeen put at half mast in honor of chris stevens. the u.s. ambassador and three other diplomats were killed in the raid. the white house is investigating whether the attacks were planned, and president obama has promised to bring the killers to justice. >> in the darkness and confusion, witnesses said the area was cordoned off by heavily armed men. the attack was linked with an american film the attackers then insulting the prophet mohammed. >> we have to stop this. stopping the film is our hope. >> by the morning the u.s. consulate in bengasi was in ruins, but this was not the first attack. in june the convoy was hit. no one was killed, and the un has also been targeted. the u.s. ambassador christopher stephens started his time as
the challenges iraq faces after the country has yet to finalize a law dictating the use of oil profits. tension continues to rise over the oil rights in the government of baghdad and the kurdish region. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you for the policy event of the fall semester and i would just mention in the way that advertisement we will be having our next program on october 23rd and we will get a notice but it will be on jordan. i think i put a title belt there in the crosshairs and we are very fortunate to have dr. washer who is the vice president for studies of the carnegie endowment for the national peace, for our foreign minister of jordan and a free good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan who is this a sea of political science at appalachian state university and a scholar and person who's written a lot about jordan. so that should be very interesting forum. but tonight, as we gather i always express my appreciation to the exxonmobil corporation which is a founder and a dillinger and gives us a substantial contribution each year to be able to put on
long war we launched after 9/11 has been ended in iraq. and all of those variables factor into decisions about how we mark this day as americans. but also how our leaders or our would be leaders mark it. how we commemorate 9/11 is a work in progress. we saw today a decision by the white house and the obama campaign to have vice president joe biden mark the day in a way that was not political. it was just about remembering the people who were lost that day and commemorating the sacrifices people have made in this country because of 9/11. while both sides in the presidential campaign suspended their negative ads for the day out of respect for the anniversary, there's no ban on campaigning today. there's no rule about what you can and cannot do. mitt romney gave a speech today before the national guard association in reno, nevada, and at times it sounded like his normal stump speech. he did go out of his way to attack president obama for defense cuts that are part of the sequester deal. which incidentally, are cuts that paul ryan voted for in congress. that's the kind of thin
revenge in the mountains and deserts of iraq and afghanistan. because a transformative moment for me, was imbedded with the first battalion of the fifth marines, in kuwait in march 2004, and we were making an overland journey of several hundred miles to fallujah, and fallujah was not yet in the news. the battle was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah, and all we did was transport one marine battalion from one place to another. no fighting in between. wasn't particularly dangerous. but the logistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water bottles. a tool kit. meals ready to eat. it was just an immense logistical exercise to get men and women and materiale from northern kuwait to fallujah without any fighting, and there you saw how distance mattered. how you just couldn't defeat distance through the latest technology. >> i think it might be interesting for the audience if you'd personalize the story of iraq a little bit, and talk about your own views. this is a place you knew, that you traveled in, in the 1980s and the time of saddam hussein. you were a s
? yes. ok - that's fine. >> i served in iraq recently and and i would be curious as to whether the report gives attention to the work we have done in iraq. there were a number of projects that n.e.d. was involved in in iraq and the republican institute assisting the iraqis preparing for elections. i was working at the provincial reconstruction team level. we have voter education as one project. we instructed iraqi schoolchildren on the concept of human rights and the role of the elections in a democratic society for grades 1-12. we were doing work in this area. iraqis complained that some of our efforts in public health was not being sufficiently publicized to the iraqi public. >> we did not really deal too much with the situation in iraq. we were looking at it from a more global point of view. many of the things you're talking about are the kinds of projects that would come under this strategy now. iraq was a different situation. we were there at large numbers with large forces and could operate in a more direct way than we could generally speaking. >> also, i don't want in a
themselves don't know. they are making this up as they go along. lara and i saw this in iraq when we were recovering that conflict. at the start of the conflict many of those who were fighting in the name of saddal hussein regarded the jihadist with a kind of contempt. gradually they became allies and the next thing you know they are not ridinged tiger, the tiger was riding them and the jihaddists had taken over the fight. then of course there was a long perd. >> then you had the awakening to split them apart. >> so there is an arc to these events. and hopefully if these things are inevitable, hopefully that arc is shortened. and the syrians learn from the iraqi experience and the next revolution overlearns from them. >> where are we with respect to iraq today, not some of we, where is iraq today. >> it's a country still trying to find a way to work different elements of that society are trying to work with each other. there is too much pent up resement among the shiite orce the snnietheris relatively new resentment among the sunnis of the shiites and they are still trying too sort out, t
of countries including yemen, somalia, and iraq. in particular al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is the group most likely we think to attempt attacks against the united states. we saw this in may with the disruption of an plot to take down an airliner. other groups such as the al qaeda in iraq, as well as militants based in pakistan all pose threats to our citizens and interests in those regions of the formed. -- world. we are also focused on threats poses by iran and hezbollah. iran remains the foremost state sponsor of terrorism over the world. over the past year the threat from iranian sponsored terrorism has increased. inside the united states we remain vigilant to prevent violent extremists from carrying out attacks in the name of al qaeda. this past week the f.b.i. arrest add chicago man after he tried to blow up a crowded bar in the city. a federal judge sentence add virginia man to 0 years in prison for plotting to bomb the u.s. capitol. these plots highlight the danger that al qaeda-inspired extremists pose to our country. beyond these threats we face a period of unrest and a period
as a navy s.e.a.l., serving multiple tours in iraq and afghanistan. since 2010, he protected american diplomatic personnel in dangerous posts from central america to the middle east. he had the hands of a healer. as well as the arms of a warrior. earning distinction as a registered nurse and certified paramedic. our hearts go out to tyrone's wife, dorothy, and his three sons, tyrone jr., hunter, and kai, born just a few months ago, along with his grieving family, friends, and colleagues. glen doherty, who went by bub, was also a former s.e.a.l. and an experienced paramedic. , too, died as he lived. serving his country and protecting his colleagues. glen deployed to some of the most dangerous places on earth, including iraq and afghanistan. always putting his life on the line to safeguard other americans. our thoughts and prayers are with glen's father, bernard, his mother, barbara, his brother, gregory, his sister, kathleen. and their grieving families, friends, and colleagues. i was honored to know ambassador chris stevens. i want to thank his parents and siblings who are here today
and protesters. i am wolf blitzer in for piers morgan. demonstrations across the region from iran and iraq to gaza, to yemen, to libya and morocco, a wave of anti-american anger that has cost the lives of ambassador chris stevens and three other americans, two of them former u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. meanwhile, president obama spoke out about all of this on the campaign trail today. >>> people around the world, i want people to hear me, to all those who would do us harm, no act of terror will go unpunished. it will not dim the light of the values that we proudly present to the rest of the world. no act of violence shakes the resolve of the united states of america. >> secretary of state, hillary clinton, tonight paid tribute to the two security personnel killed alongside ambassador chris stevens. tyrone wood and glen dougherty. she said, this violence should shock people of all faiths and traditions. people of conscience and good will every we are must stand together against violence, hate and division. we have two reporters covering this story for us. arwa damon is in tripoli. ben wedeman is i
. they are there. multiple tours serving for this country in iraq and afghanistan. also glen doherty. the former navy seal 42 years old. according to the secretary of state he was an experienced navy seal, paramedic in. a statement his brother said that he joined the seals in 1995 because he had a desire to push himself and to use his talent to make general june change in the world. i have standing by colonel jack jacobs. i'm hoping that we can talk with the colonel about what we are witnessing here. the white house is saying that this is not the so-called dignified transfer of remains. but a ceremony nonetheless. the transfer of remains. you've seen this too many times when it's been soldiers fighting for our country. these are diplomats who were working and serving as the face of our country. around the world. >> this kind of ceremony takes place all the time down in dover, delaware, where the bodies of the fallen come back from southwest asia after fighting in afghanistan and iraq. this is a very big deal for the white house because it breaks to have been control of the natural security high
to make clear that even though he was elected as an opponent of the iraq war, he does not shrink from using power in the muslim world. >> religion is used to justify the murder of innocents by those who have distorted and defiled the great religion of islam. and who attacked my country. i face the world as it is. and cannot stand idle in the face of threats to the american people. chris: but governor romney was suggesting weakness and now the tarke on our consulate in benghazi where four americans were murdered. >> we express immediately when we feel that the president and his administration have done something which is inconsistent with the principles of america. chris: a similar test after the failed mission to rescue the iranian hostages, during the presidential campaign of 1980, governor ronald reagan did not use a vulnerable moment to crilt size president carter. -- to criticize president carter. >> words should be few and confined to our prayers. because of the extremely sensitive nature of the situation, i am convinced that it is and would be inappropriate for me to go beyond t
in geneva. in addition to the foreign ministers of the permanent five we had qatar, kuwait, turkey and iraq there, with the secretaries general of the arab league and the u.n.. and the whole idea was to review syria, not in the competitive sort of where this group supports but to come together to see how we can move forward. and we agreed on the need for political transition and political settlement. and came up with guidelines and principleses for political-- if you wish a road masically saying there has to be an interim government, an interim government that will have full executive power. we need to try and maintain the security forces so that people will be protected and particularly in a situation where they also have chemical weapons. that has to be protected. as well as insurance that governmental institutions do not collapse. nobody wants a chaotic collapse. and everybody agreed. all, and they were to come to new york and endorse that agreement. tha has n been done yet. >> why not? >> i think when they got to new york they did not focus on building on that substantive gain in again
, instead of focusing on iraq and saddam hussein. eichenwald writes -- >> to talk about the significance of these findings, we're joined by the author himself, kurt eichenwald, an award winning journalist and contributing editor at "vanity fair." his of a guest today is called, "the deafness before the storm." his latest book, "500 days: secrets and lies in the terror wars." we welcome you to "democracy now!" lay out the chronology for us but a lot of people know august 6, 2001, right before the september 11 attacks, explain then that memo and how you went back. >> that is the way to look at this, which is backwards. in 2004, the 9/11 commission hearings were saying, we want to see these presidential daily greeks. the bush administration fought releasing them. they finally released the august 61, which now have the infamous headline "bin laden determined to strike u.s.." in her testimony, condoleezza rice, the national security adviser at the time, said this was merely a historical document, a review of bin laden and al qaeda and what they've done. when you read it, that is what it was.
that when they lose, and if they lose, they're going to be cast out. it'll be like the sunnis in iraq, who were cleaned out of every major government agency. >> over time, bashar al-assad was successful in convincing the majority of the alawites that his political survival is synonymous with their physical survival. and they have started seeing this fight in existential terms. >> it's very understandable why alawites would believe today that if they were to lose, they would lose more than the privileges that the regime has had. they would lose everything. >> narrator: the alawites' improbable rise to power in syria was set in motion by bashar's father, hafez al-assad. his path to power was through the military, which was dominated by alawites. a rising star in syria's socialist ba'ath party, at age 40, he engineered a coup to seize the presidency. >> hafez al-assad rose to power from the bottom up. he had to fight the battles that came with the coup d'├ętats, that came with trying to corral the different forces of the country into his camp. >> he knew he had to gain support of the other mi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 773 (some duplicates have been removed)